10 Most Magnificent Trees in the World

“A tree is a wonderful living organism which gives shelter, food,
warmth and protection to all living things. It even gives shade to
those who wield an axe to cut it down
” – Buddha.

 

There are probably hundreds of majestic and magnificent trees in the world – of these, some are particularly special:

 

10. Lone Cypress in Monterey

The Lone Cypress

(Image credit: bdinphoenix [flickr])

Lone Cypress at Pebble Beach

(Image credit: mikemac29 [flickr])

Buffeted by the cold Pacific Ocean wind, the scraggly Lone Cypress [wiki] (Cupressus macrocarpa) in Pebble Beach, Monterey Peninsula, California, isn’t a particularly large tree. It makes up for its small size, however, with its iconic status as a stunningly beautiful tree in splendid isolation, framed by an even more beautiful background of the Pacific Ocean.

 

9. Circus Trees

As a hobby, bean farmer Axel Erlandson [wiki] shaped trees – he pruned, bent, and grafted trees into fantastic shapes and called them “Circus Trees.” For example, to make this “Basket Tree” arborsculpture, Erlandson planted six sycamore trees in a circle and then grafted them together to form the diamond patterns.

Basket Circus Tree

Basket Tree (Image credit: jpeepz [flickr])

Circus Tree with Two Legs

The two-legged tree (Image credit: Vladi22, Wikipedia)

Ladder Tree

Ladder tree (Image credit: Arborsmith)

Axel Erlandson underneath a Circus Tree

Axel Erlandson underneath one of his arborsculpture (Image credit: Wilma Erlandson, Cabinet Magazine)

Erlandson was very secretive and refused to reveal his methods on how to grow the Circus Trees (he even carried out his graftings behind screens to protect against spies!) and carried the secrets to his grave.

The trees were later bought by millionaire Michael Bonfante, who transplanted them to his amusement park Bonfante Gardens in Gilroy in 1985.

 

8. Giant Sequoias: General Sherman

General Sherman Tree

(Image credit: Humpalumpa [flickr])

Giant Sequoias [wiki] (Sequoiadendron giganteum), which only grow in Sierra Nevada, California, are the world’s biggest trees (in terms of volume). The biggest is General Sherman [wiki] in the Sequoia National Park – one behemoth of a tree at 275 feet (83.8 m), over 52,500 cubic feet of volume (1,486 m³), and over 6000 tons in weight.

General Sherman is approximately 2,200 years old – and each year, the tree adds enough wood to make a regular 60-foot tall tree. It’s no wonder that naturalist John Muir said “The Big Tree is Nature’s forest masterpiece, and so far as I know, the greatest of living things.”

For over a century there was a fierce competition for the title of the largest tree: besides General Sherman, there is General Grant [wiki] at King’s Canyon National Park, which actually has a larger circumference (107.5 feet / 32.77 m vs. Sherman’s 102.6 feet / 31.27 m).

In 1921, a team of surveyors carefully measured the two giants – with their data, and according to the complex American Forestry Association system of judging a tree, General Grant should have been award the title of largest tree – however, to simplify the matter, it was later determined that in this case, volume, not point system, should be the determining factor.

 

7. Coast R edwood: Hyperion and Drive-Thru Trees

Stratosphere Giant

 There is another sequoia species (not to be confused with Giant Sequoia) that is quite remarkable: the Coast Redwood [wiki] (Sequoia sempervirens), the tallest trees in the world.

The reigning champion is a tree called Hyperion in the Redwood National Park, identified by researcher Chris Atkins and amateur naturalist Michael Taylor in 2006. Measuring over 379 feet (155.6 115 m) tall, Hyperion beat out the previous record holder Stratosphere Giant [wiki] in the Humboldt Redwoods State Park (at 370 feet / 112.8 m).

The scientists aren’t talking about the exact location of Hyperion: the terrain is difficult, and they don’t want a rush of visitors to come and trample the tree’s root system.

[Image: The Stratosphere Giant – still an impressive specimen, previously the world’s tallest tree until dethroned by Hyperion in 2006.]

That’s not all that’s amazing about the Coast Redwood: there are four giant California redwoods big enough that you can drive your car through them!

The most famous of the drive-through trees is the Chandelier Tree [wiki] in Leggett, California. It’s a 315 foot tall redwood tree, with a 6 foot wide by 9 foot tall hole cut through its base in the 1930s.

 

 

Chandelier Tree

Chandelier Tree. (Image credit: hlh-abg [flickr])

6. Chapel-Oak of Allouville-Bellefosse

Chapel Oak Tree

Chapel-Oak of Allouville-Bellefosse (Image credit: Old trees in Netherlands & Europe)

Chapel Oak Tree

(Image credit: dm1795 [flickr])

Chapel Oak Tree

(Image credit: Luc Doudet)

The Chêne-Chapelle (Chapel-Oak) of Allouville-Bellefosse is the most famous tree in France – actually, it’s more than just a tree: it’s a building and a religious monument all in one.

In 1669, l’Abbe du Detroit and du Cerceau decided to build a chapel in (at that time) a 500 years old or so oak (Quercus robur) tree made hollow by a lightning bolt. The priests built a small altar to the Virgin Mary. Later on, a second chapel and a staircase were added.

Now, parts of the tree are dead, the crown keeps becoming smaller and smaller every year, and parts of the tree’s bark, which fell off due to old age, are covered by protective oak shingles. Poles and cables support the aging tree, which in fact, may not live much longer. As a symbol, however, it seems that the Chapel-Oak of Allouville-Bellefosse may live on forever.

 

5. Quaking Aspen: Pando (The Trembling Giant)

Quaking Aspen Grove

Quaking Aspen (Image: Wikipedia)

Aspen Grove

Aspen grove (Image credit: scottks1 [flickr])

Aspen in winter and snow

Quaking Aspen in winter (Image credit: darkmatter [flickr])

Pando [wiki] or the Trembling Giant in Utah is actually a colony of a single Quaking Aspen (Populus tremuloides) tree. All of the trees (technically, “stems”) in this colony are genetically identical (meaning, they’re exact clones of one another). In fact, they are all a part of a single living organism with an enormous underground root system.

Pando, which is Latin for “I Spread,” is composed of about 47,000 stems spread throughout 107 acres of land. It estimated to weigh 6,600 tons, making it the heaviest known organism. Although the average age of the individual stems are 130 years, the entire organism is estimated to be about 80,000 years old!

4. Montezuma Cypress: The Tule Tree

Tule Tree next to a church

The Tule Tree Towers over a church next to it (Image credit: jubilohaku [flickr])

Girth of the Tule Tree

Full width of the Tule Tree (Image credit: Gengiskanhg, Wikipedia)

Detail of knotted burl of the Tule Tree

Close-up of the tree’s gnarled trunk. Local legends say that you can make out animals like jaguars and elephants in the trunk, giving the tree the nickname of “the Tree of Life” (Image credit: jvcluis )

El Árbol del Tule [wiki] (“The Tule Tree”) is an especially large Montezuma cypress (Taxodium mucronatum) near the city of Oaxaca, Mexico. This tree has the largest trunk girth at 190 feet (58 m) and trunk diameter at 37 feet (11.3 m). The Tule tree is so thick that people say you don’t hug this tree, it hugs you instead!

For a while, detractors argued that it was actually three trees masquerading as one – however, careful DNA analysis confirmed that it is indeed one magnificent tree.

In 1994, the tree (and Mexican pride) were in jeopardy: the leaves were sickly yellow and there were dead branches everywhere- the tree appeared to be dying. When tree “doctors” were called in, they diagnosed the problem as dying of thirst. The prescription? Give it water. Sure enough, the tree soon recovered after a careful watering program was followed.

3. Banyan Tree: Sri Maha Bodhi Tree

The Banyan tree is named after “banians” or Hindu traders who carry out their business under the tree. Even if you have never heard of a Banyan tree (it was the tree used by Robinson Crusoe for his treehouse), you’d still recognize it. The shape of the giant tree is unmistakable: it has a majestic canopy with aerial roots running from the branches to the ground.

Banyan tree

Banyan tree (Image credit: Diorama Sky [flickr])

Banyan tree\'s aerial root system

Closer view of the Banyan aerial root structure (Image credit: BillyCrafton [flickr])

If you were thinking that the Banyan tree looks like the trees whose roots snake through the ruins of the Ta Prohm temple like tentacles of the jungle (Lara Croft, anyone?) at Ankor, Cambodia , you’d be right!

Banyan tree at Ta Prohm temple

Banyan tree (or is it silk-cotton tree?) in the ruins of Ta Prohm, Ankor, Cambodia (Image Credit: Casual Chin [flickr])

One of the most famous species of Banyan, called the Sacred Fig [wiki] or Bo tree, is the Sri Maha Bodhi [wiki] tree in Anuradhapura, Sri Lanka. It is said that the tree was grown from a cutting from the original tree under which Buddha became enlightened in the 6th century BC.

Planted in 288 BC, it is the oldest living human-planted tree in the world, with a definitive planting date!

Banyan Tree which Buddha sat under

(Image credit: Images of Ceylon)

Sri Maha Bodhi

(Image credit: Wikipedia)

2. Bristlecone Pine: Methuselah and Prometheus, the Oldest Trees in the World.

Methuselah Grove (Image Credit: NOVA Online)

Prometheus bristlecone pine grove

Bristlecone pine grove in which Prometheus grew (Image credit: James R. Bouldin, Wikipedia)

The oldest living tree in the world is a White Mountains, California, bristlecone pine (Pinus longaeva) named Methuselah [wiki], after the Biblical figure who lived to 969 years old. The Methuselah tree, found at 11,000 feet above sea level, is 4,838 years old – it is not only the oldest tree but also the oldest living non-clonal organism in the world.

Before Methuselah was identified as the world’s oldest tree by Edmund Schulman in 1957, people thought that the Giant Sequoias were the world’s oldest trees at about 2,000 years old. Schulman used a borer to obtain a core sample to count the growth rings of various bristlecone pines, and found over a dozen trees over 4,000 years old.

The story of Prometheus [wiki] is even more interesting: in 1964, Donald R. Currey [wiki], then a graduate student, was taking core samples from a tree named Prometheus. His boring tool broke inside the tree, so he asked for permission from the US Forest Service to cut it down and examine the full cross section of the wood. Surprisingly the Forest Service agreed! When they examined the tree, Prometheus turned out to be about 5,000 years old, which would have made it the world’s oldest tree when the scientist unwittingly killed it!

Stump of Prometheus

Stump of the Prometheus Tree. (Image Credit: James R. Bouldin, Wikipedia)

Today, to protect the trees from the inquisitive traveler, the authorities are keeping their location secret (indeed, there are no photos identifying Methuselah for fear of vandalism).

1. Baobab

The amazing baobab [wiki] (Adansonia) or monkey bread tree can grow up to nearly 100 feet (30 m) tall and 35 feet (11 m) wide. Their defining characteristic: their swollen trunk are actually water storage – the baobab tree can store as much as 31,700 gallon (120,000 l) of water to endure harsh drought conditions.

Baobab trees are native to Madagascar (it’s the country’s national tree!), mainland Africa, and Australia. A cluster of “the grandest of all” baobab trees (Adansonia grandidieri) can be found in the Baobab Avenue, near Morondava, in Madagascar:

Baobab Avenue

(Image credit: Fox-Talbot, Wikipedia)

Baobab

(Image credit: plizzba [flickr])

Baobab at sunset

(Image credit: Daniel Montesino [flickr])

In Ifaty, southwestern Madagascar, other baobabs take the form of bottles, skulls, and even teapots:

Teapot baobab

Teapot baobab (Image credit: Gilles Croissant)

The baobab trees in Africa are amazing as well:

Baobab in Tanzania

Baobab in Tanzania (Image credit: telethon [flickr])

Another baobab in Africa

Baobab near Bulawayo, Zimbabwe (Image credit: ironmanix [flickr])

There are many practical uses of baobab trees, like for a toilet:

Toilet inside a baobab tree

A toilet built inside a baobab tree in the Kayila Lodge, Zambia (Image credit: Steve Makin [flickr])

… and even for a prison:

Prison boab

A “Prison Baob” tree in Western Australia (Image credit: yewenyi [flickr])

Bonus: Tree That Owns Itself

Tree that Owns Itself

Son of the Tree That Owns Itself (Image Credit: Bloodofox, Wikipedia)

Legend has it that the Tree That Owns Itself [wiki], a white oak in Athens, Georgia was given ownership of itself and the surrounding land by Dr. William Henry Jackson in 1820! The original tree had died long ago, but a new tree (Son of The Tree That Owns Itself) was planted at the same location from one of its acorns.

Bonus 2: The Lonely Tree of Ténéré

Tree of Tenere

The Tree of Ténéré in the 1970s, before a truck crashed into it (Image credit: Peter Krohn)

The Tree of Ténéré or L’Abre du Ténéré was the world’s most isolated tree – the solitary acacia, which grew in the Sahara desert in Niger, Africa, was the only tree within more than 250 miles (400 km) around.

The tree was the last surviving member of a group of acacias that grew when the desert wasn’t as dry. When scientists dug a hole near the tree, they found its roots went down as deep as 120 feet (36 m) below to the water table!

Apparently, being the only tree in that part of the wide-open desert (remember: there wasn’t another tree for 250 miles around), wasn’t enough to stop a drunk Libyan truck driver from driving his truck into it, knocking it down and killing it!

Now, a metal sculpture was placed in its spot to commemorate the Lonely Tree of Ténéré:

Metal sculpture of Tenere tree

(Image credit: Nomad’s Land, main website)


I’ll be the first to acknowledge that this list is far from complete: there are many more magnificent trees in the world (for instance, see the List of Famous Trees [wiki]). If you have any addition of noteworthy tree (and stories about trees), please leave it in the comment section.

 

SOURCE: http://www.neatorama.com/2007/03/21/10-most-magnificent-trees-in-the-world/#!bLr1Uh

 

 

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Top ten hardest woods in the world

Wood

Wood hardness is rated on the Janka scale. The Janka hardness test measures the resistance of a type of wood to withstand denting and wear. It measures the force required to embed an 11.28 mm (0.444 in) steel ball into wood to half the ball’s diameter. This method leaves an indentation. A common use of Janka hardness ratings is to determine whether a species is suitable for use as flooring. Lignum vitae, at 4500 Janka, is the hardest wood there is. Let’s see the top ten hardest woods in the world

 

 

Lignum vitae

#1 – Lignum vitae (4500)

Lignum vitae is a trade wood, known in Europe as pockenholz. This wood was once very important for applications requiring a material with its extraordinary combination of strength, toughness and density. Lignum vitae is hard and durable, and is also the densest wood traded; it will easily sink in water.

Angico, Kurupayra

#2 – Angico, Kurupayra (3840)

Kurupayra, coming from the same family as Pepperwood, is incredibly durable with one of the highest Janka hardness ratings of 3,840. The vibrant wood features a reddish brown heartwood with yellow tones. The warming fusion of the red-browns and yellow creates a cozy feeling in any room and goes particularly well with white decor.

Ipe

#3 – Ipê (3684)

Ipe is an incredibly durable wood. Its dense cell structure serves as a natural deterrent to insects, decay, and molds. Because of this natural resilience Ipe is often the first choice for decking because of its almost unparalleled ability to stand up to the elements. More than just durable, Ipe is also very pleasing to the eye. Its heartwood is light to dark olive brown with contrasting yellowish-grey or grey brown tones accompanying it. With a Class A fire rating, Ipe occupies the same class of fire-retardant materials as steel. For durability, safety, and beauty, Ipe makes an excellent choice.

Cumaru

#4 – Cumaru – Brazilian Teak (3540)

Brazilian Teak, called Cumaru in South America, is a wood whose natural tones vary from yellowish tan to more muted medium brown to darker sienna. Brazilian Teak is a dense and hardwood, and combined with its vibrant beauty, its strength and durability keep this wood among the top three choices in exotic hardwood flooring.

Ebony

#5 – Ebony (3220)

Ebony is any very dense black wood. Ebony has a very high density and will sink in water. Its fine texture, and very smooth finish when polished, have made it very valuable as an ornamental wood. Ebony has a long history of use, with carved pieces having been found in Ancient Egyptian tombs.

Brazilian RedWood

#6 – Brazilian RedWood (3190)

Known for both its incredible durability as a hardwood and the elegant muted Cherry tones it offers aesthetically, Brazilian Redwood far surpasses domestic Redwood in beauty and reliability. Even when it has darkened with age, this wood, known in South America as Massaranduba, remains a bright feature in a room, making it an ideal choice for creating a room with an airy yet warm and inviting atmosphere.

Bamboo

#7 – Bamboo (3000)

Bamboo flooring is growing in popularity and is an attractive, cheaper, and more eco-friendly alternative to hardwood floors. Similar to hardwoods in look, strength and durability, it’s also a renewable material. Actually a grass, bamboo can grow over 1 meter in 24 hours, and takes between three and five years to fully mature, as opposed to the decades that it takes traditional hardwoods to mature.

Bloodwood

#8 – Bloodwood (2900)

Jatoba is a hardwood species known more commonly as Brazilian Cherry. Imported from Brazil, this South American wood encompasses a range of light and dark reddish brown shades that vary in color and streak. Brazilian Cherry is 228% harder than domestic red oak, making it a strong, durable wood and a reliable choice in flooring.

Rock Mahogany

#9 – Rock Mahogany (2697)

Thanks to its widespread use in Victorian furnishings, mahogany is invariably associated with elegance. A reddish-brown color and close grain pattern make this species an ideal choice for creating a rich, sophisticated environment.

Brazilian Cherry - Jatoba

#10 – Brazilian Cherry – Jatoba (2350)

A deep and dark red color with a very distinct grain, Bloodwood is one of the higher density woods from South America. Bloodwood has beautiful grain characteristics and colors ranging from medium red to almost purple.

Source: http://www.tenorama.com/en/ranking/top-ten-hardest-woods-world

 

Casting Color Over Kids Rooms

If there’s one room in the house that really cries out for some fun color treatment, it has to be a kid’s room. Even if the rest of your home is a slightly sombre affair, this is one area where one should shake off any inhibitions and go for broke!

Yellow is a gender neutral shade that adds a lively blast to any kids room, and the cool geometric shape rug really adds to the oomph in this room too.

1| Visualizer: Pelod

Yellow is a gender neutral shade that adds a lively blast to any kids room, and the cool geometric shape rug really adds to the oomph in this room too.

Shades of purple and pink have been a big winner in girls rooms for years, and there are no signs that this is about to change anytime soon. Follow the girly fashion full-on and team sherbet shades with beautiful butterflies and majestic horses.

2| Shades of purple and pink have been a big winner in girls rooms for years, and there are no signs that this is about to change anytime soon. Follow the girly fashion full-on and team sherbet shades with beautiful butterflies and majestic horses.

Purple girls bedroom

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Purple pink girls decor

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This fresh scheme escapes the typically girly colors and instead replaces them with fresh tones of apple green, lemon yellow and aqua blue, with just the tiniest nod to the pink tradition.

5| This fresh scheme escapes the typically girly colors and instead replaces them with fresh tones of apple green, lemon yellow and aqua blue, with just the tiniest nod to the pink tradition.

Funky kids room design

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Fun kids room design

7|

Here we see the butterfly theme again through transfers that can be applied to both the walls and furniture.

8| Here we see the butterfly theme again through transfers that can be applied to both the walls and furniture.

Pink blue girls room

9|

Butterfly theme bedroom

10|

These cute candy sprinkles of color appear vibrant against the crisp white walls of this non age specific scheme. As the walls are kept blank, with only the duvet cover, accent cushions and wall art to make the statement, this is a room design that could continually evolve with your child as they grow, thus eliminating the need for costly and time consuming redecoration. There is just one small alcove of color peeking beyond the bookcase, but this sunshine shade would appeal to toddlers and teens alike.

11| These cute candy sprinkles of color appear vibrant against the crisp white walls of this non age specific scheme. As the walls are kept blank, with only the duvet cover, accent cushions and wall art to make the statement, this is a room design that could continually evolve with your child as they grow, thus eliminating the need for costly and time consuming redecoration. There is just one small alcove of color peeking beyond the bookcase, but this sunshine shade would appeal to toddlers and teens alike.

Modern kids furniture

12|

Modern white kids room

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Modern kids room

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These minty interruptions really freshen up a monochrome scheme.

15| Visualizer: Anna Teklyuk

These minty interruptions really freshen up a monochrome scheme.

A calming environment can be created with sky blue hues teamed with pure white. With a bedroom scheme this dreamy you might want to steal it for yourself!

16| Visualizer: Angelo Fernandez

A calming environment can be created with sky blue hues teamed with pure white. With a bedroom scheme this dreamy you might want to steal it for yourself!

A little bit of wood tone looks wonderful with yellow hints on a white backdrop.

17| A little bit of wood tone looks wonderful with yellow hints on a white backdrop.

Neutral kids room

18| Visualizer: Eugene Zhdanov

White kids bedroom

19| Visualizer: Alex Gore

Source: http://www.home-designing.com/2013/11/casting-color-over-kids-rooms

Luxurious Room Schemes

We’re featuring some rather luxurious room designs from the portfolio of Pivot Studio here, with plenty of inspiration to translate into your own palace. Offering up textured and extruded feature walls, extraordinarily asymmetrical storage solutions and joyous lighting schemes, these designs are sure to impress.

modern interiors

modular coffee table

modern luxurious living room

luxury living room lighting

The extruded sections of this wooden feature wall are both design and function, becoming shelf space as they swell at the lower half of the wall.

The extruded sections of this wooden feature wall are both design and function, becoming shelf space as they swell at the lower half of the wall.

Recessed light wells cast a soft glow over each half of the room, and a perimeter glow accentuates the rippling texture of the wall behind the sofa. For decoration more so than function, a pretty pendant shade takes center stage.

Recessed light wells cast a soft glow over each half of the room, and a perimeter glow accentuates the rippling texture of the wall behind the sofa. For decoration more so than function, a pretty pendant shade takes center stage.

This bedroom has a series of sharp cutaways over the headboard feature wall, a pattern that is echoed in the pattern of the fitted carpet, ceiling light wells and the dressing table mirrors that run directly into recessed shelving cubbies.

This bedroom has a series of sharp cutaways over the headboard feature wall, a pattern that is echoed in the pattern of the fitted carpet, ceiling light wells and the dressing table mirrors that run directly into recessed shelving cubbies.

This bedroom has a much softer scheme, where light filters through a shutter design in the center of the ceiling.

This bedroom has a much softer scheme, where light filters through a shutter design in the center of the ceiling.

 

SOURCE: http://www.home-designing.com/2014/05/luxurious-room-schemes

Wooden Finish Wall Unit Combinations From Hülsta

German-based Hülsta Furniture’s range of modern media units are created by master craftsmen from fine light to dark woods. Their designs lend themselves to a minimalist styling. They boast flat front accents, clean lines and a myriad of multi-unit groupings.

This medium wood media unit offers plenty of storage and display surfaces to hold oft-used items and everyday devices.

1 |

This medium wood media unit offers plenty of storage and display surfaces to hold oft-used items and everyday devices.

flat front modern wood media center with wall unit

2|

artisan crafted raw wood media unit

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White media center with wall unit

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multipiece smooth wood media group

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modern medium wood media center

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modern living room with dark wood media center

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This minimalist media wall grouping makes quite an impression with wall cabinets, a low profile tv and accent piece and a series of staggard wall shelves.

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minimal design media center with wall cabinet

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light wood modern media center with chocolate accents

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light wood media center with wall unit

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A rustic, richly grained wood finish highlights this large entertainment center which spans the wall in this modern living.

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A rustic, richly grained wood finish highlights this large entertainment center which spans the wall in this modern living.

This entertainment center spans floor to ceiling, offering a myriad of shelving possibilities and storage space.

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artisan crafted raw wood media unit

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With its simple white finish and light unfinished wood accents, this simplistic media center is accompanied by a wall shelving unit.

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The built in speakers are bluetooth connected.

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modern media unit

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modern media unit with shelf

18|

 

 

SOURCE: http://www.home-designing.com/2012/12/wooden-finish-wall-unit-combinations-from-hulsta

10 Classic and Retro Style Living Rooms

Period rooms or reflections of them can be a real tricky venture because if not done wisely, can look tacky and gimmicky or unconvincing. The rooms below represent 3D conceptual spaces from an older era. Though the furniture may not be true to any particular period they’re going for there is no denying the traditional charm in each of them. The designers of these classic and retro style living rooms have added a touch of modernity by mixing contemporary with antique furniture or using a trendy color scheme or pattern that makes them super alluring.


One look at this image and you would feel the 50′s are back with contrasting colors and style! designed by hai tharr


Chrome creates a retro feeling in this space created by Thiago Marcondes


Classic style chandelier and wallpaper pattern are made modern… Conceived by Sascha


Contemporary earth tones dominate this classically designed room by HePe Design


This Concept by raaab reflects the 70′s monochromatic schemes with a touch of modern classic furniture.


Using Louis XVI style chairs in a hallway created by Polygon Eater


This room is pushing 70′s retro with its marble floors and mauve accents. Designed by Johnny Young


This room looks modern classic because of the blue lampshade chandelier, and black accent wall. Designed by HePe Design


The miss matched patterns on the chairs and floor are typical of retro style rooms…Designed by Nyoman Winaya


A very red classic room via.

If you enjoyed this, perhaps you would also like our post on foyer decorating ideas.

 

 

SOURCE: http://www.home-designing.com/2010/11/classic-retro-style-living-rooms

Oak Specie

The oak tree has long been prized for legendary strength, longevity and excellent wood properties. Oak trees adapt well in the natural forest, the suburban yard and oak parks of inner cities. Oaks have become objects of art, myth and worship and frequently, oak trees are chosen as a symbol for all trees and for forestry in general. An oak tree is the state tree of Maryland, Connecticut, Illinois, Georgia, New Jersey and Iowa. The mighty oak is also the official tree of the capitol of the United States, Washington, D.C.

1 . White Oaks (The Major Oaks)

White Oak

Does your tree have leaves that are rounded in the bottom of the sinus and at the top of the lobe and have no spines? If so you have a white oak.

2. Red Oaks (The Major Oaks)

Red Oak

Red oak

Does your tree have leaves that are angular to rounded at the base of the sinus and angular at the top of the lobe and have small spines? If so you have a red oak.

3. American Holly

American Holly

Does your tree have evergreen leaves that are angular at the tip of the lobe and shallow, rounded at the base of the lobe and have large, sharp spines? Does your tree have red berries? If so you have an American holly.
Source: http://forestry.about.com/od/treeidentification/tp/tree_key_id_pinnalobed.htm | http://forestry.about.com/od/hardwoods/tp/the_oak_tree.htm

Allied Works Carves a Winery Out of Cedar

Allied Works Architecture wrapped Sokol Blosser Winery’s new tasting room in grey-stained cedar. (Jeremy Bittermann)

Allied Works Architecture wrapped Sokol Blosser Winery’s new tasting room in grey-stained cedar. (Jeremy Bittermann)

Sokol Blosser Winery‘s Willamette Valley tasting room, designed by Allied Works Architecture, pays homage to its agricultural surroundings in its massing and materials. Nestled within a set of terraces scooped out of the Dundee Hills, the building plants roots with a below-grade cellar, on top of which its long, low first story spreads like grape vines along a trellis. Both exterior and interior are wrapped in locally-sourced cedar siding—rough grey boards hung horizontally on the outside, smooth clear wood laid diagonally on the inside—whose regularity recalls aerial photographs of the vineyard. “We went with wood for a number of reasons,” explained principal Kyle Lommen. “There’s a history of wood in the agrarian architecture of that region. There’s a history of wood in wineries as well. And there was a desire to create an atmosphere that is warm and had a material quality.”

 

The rain screen system incorporates boards of three different sizes, flipped to provide relief. (Bittermann Photography)

The rain screen system incorporates boards of three different sizes, flipped to provide relief. (Jeremy Bittermann)

Though the open front porch and fissures between the building’s several volumes create a fluid interplay between outside and inside, Allied Works Architecture used texture and color to distinguish the exterior skin. “We wanted to create an expression of the outer crust, the outer envelope of the building, and have it play or pick up the daylight that hits the building,” said Lommen. The architects chose a few different sizes of cedar boards, stained grey, then flipped them around “so as the sun hits the wood it creates a shadow, a kind of relief,” he explained. “The wall has a very random pattern, but it’s created from only three different board sizes.”

Inside, diagonal runs of clear cedar change each time they hit a seam. (Bittermann Photography)

Inside, diagonal runs of clear cedar change direction each time they hit a seam. (Jeremy Bittermann)

 

The horizontal rain screen system on the tasting room facade contrasts sharply with the interior, where unstained boards set flush with one another travel in diagonal paths along the walls and sloped ceilings. Because the orientation of the boards changes each time they meet a seam, “it almost does this visual trick, creates a kind of complexity through a very simple concept,” said Lommen. The interior siding extends onto the ceiling of the porch and the walls of the gaps between rooms, suggesting a solid block carved into a succession of spaces. The architects used sketches and drawings to establish the basic design concept before moving through several iterations of physical models. “We created a digital model as well to create perspectives that helped us understand materiality,” said Lommen. “We did a number of perspectives to make sure that we weren’t creating an environment that was too hectic, too busy. Through studies we realized it would be quite calm.” The material studies, he said, were also helpful for the client, who had never worked on a project of this scale. Yet none of Allied Works Architecture’s renderings captured the impact of the built space, said Lommen. “When the project was close to completion I was on site talking to the client, and they said, ‘We never really understood what we were getting, even after all these models and exterior perspectives,’” he recalled. “Even for us as the architects, it ends up being more rich going to see the building.”

Fissures between the building’s volumes are covered in clear cedar, suggesting a single block carved into several pieces. (Bittermann Photography)

Fissures between the building’s volumes are covered in clear cedar, suggesting a single block carved into several pieces. (Jeremy Bittermann)

 

SOURCE: http://blog.archpaper.com/wordpress/archives/88842#.U-LLQKNTUju

Acacia Specie

There are about 1,300 different species of acacia trees and shrubs. A few acacia plants produce wood that can be used for furniture, ornaments, and flooring, as well as for firewood and pulpwood in the paper industry. Acacia wood is especially prized for furniture, because of its durability, lustrous finish, and varied shades.

Most acacia species are native to Australia, and the rest grow in tropical or temperate regions around the world. In addition to timber, acacia plants produce gum, tannin, edible shoots, and seeds and flowers with both culinary and medicinal uses. Acacia flowers are also used in perfume and aromatherapy.

A bowl made of Acacia Wood

Acacia wood has a long history of use. One variety, red acacia or Acacia seyal, is believed to have been used to build Egyptian coffins, the Ark of the Covenant, and Noah’s Ark. Red acacia is native to northern and western Africa, where its wood is also burned as incense to treat joint pain and prevent fever.
Many varieties of acacia wood are both attractive and fragrant, making them ideal for luxury items and furnishings. One of the most valuable acacia wood varieties is Australian Blackwood, or Acacia melanoxylon. Blackwood trees can grow very large, up to 148 feet (45 m), and their timber is used in decorative furniture such as cabinetry, musical instruments, wooden tools and kegs, and boat building. Australian Blackwood features very light sapwood and rich, brown heartwood. Another Australian acacia variety, Myall wood or Acacia omalophylla, is also fragrant and used in ornaments.

Some guitars are made of Acacia specie

Noah’s Ark is said to have been built from Red Acacia Wood

 

SOURCE: http://www.wisegeek.org/what-is-acacia-wood.htm#